Your Favourite Design,
in Your Favourite Colour.

Accessory Case | 01. Sakura | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware
Accessory Case | 02. Shochikubai | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware
Accessory Case | 03 Ume / vermilion | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware
Accessory Case | 04. Ume / black | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware
Accessory Case | 05. Nichigetsu / vermilion | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware
Accessory Case | 06. Nichigetsu / black | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware
Accessory Case | 07. Akikusa / vermilion | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware
Accessory Case | 08. Akikusa / black | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware
Accessory Case | 09. Musubi / vermilion | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware
Accessory Case | 10. Musubi / black | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware
Accessory Case | 11. Byakudan | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

01

Accessory Case | 01. Sakura | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

Sakura (桜 Cherry Blossom)

Japan's national flower, a cherry blossom reaches its glory in the spring when it blooms delicate pink flowers. It is all the more beautiful for its fragility, coming into full bloom only to fall within a week or so. Such gracefulness has been attracting the Japanese for so long that it appears even in classical poems sung more than 1,200 years ago. Every well-known poet - from the royal families to professional poets to anonymous townspeople - read a cherry blossom as a token of affection, be it love or friendship. Today, cherry trees are sent as the symbol of peace to historical areas, such as the Washington, D.C. and the remains of the Berlin Wall.

* Best as a gift for any occasion, especially to show affection. *

02

Accessory Case | 02. Shochikubai | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

Shochikubai (松竹梅 Pine, Bamboo, and Plum)

The combination of a pine, a bamboo, and a plum typifies an auspicious sign in Japan. They are often used as decorations for New Year's celebrations or weddings, for the three motifs embody prosperity as they endure winter and flourish in the spring. The pine has a strong vitality to survive winter even when its needles are puffed with snow. The bamboo grows, or rather shoots up from under the snow-clad ground, at a rapid speed. The plum, upon the coming of the thaw, will be the first to bear its sweet pink flowers. While the first two evergreens represent eternal life, the plum arouses an image of pure nobility.

* Best as a gift for New Year's celebration, marriage, and birth delivery. *

03

Accessory Case | 03. Ume / vermilion | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

Ume (梅 Plum)

A plum has long been one of the favourite flowers of the Japanese, for its pink colour and sweet scent. It gives seemingly opposite images of innocence and strong fibre at the same time, both from how it flourishes during the winter. Upon the coming of the thaw, a plum bears its flowers before any other plants do. The contrast, deep pink fluttering in white of the snow, touches hearts of the Japanese so much that it appears in traditional poems almost as often as a cherry blossom, Japan's national flower, does. Its energy, along with elegance in the visual, has associated a plum with a wish for the sound growth of a new-born baby.

* Best as a gift for birth delivery. *

04

Accessory Case | 04. Ume / black | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

Ume (梅 Plum)

A plum has long been one of the favourite flowers of the Japanese, for its pink colour and sweet scent. It gives seemingly opposite images of innocence and strong fibre at the same time, both from how it flourishes during the winter. Upon the coming of the thaw, a plum bears its flowers before any other plants do. The contrast, deep pink fluttering in white of the snow, touches hearts of the Japanese so much that it appears in traditional poems almost as often as a cherry blossom, Japan's national flower, does. Its energy, along with elegance in the visual, has associated a plum with a wish for the sound growth of a new-born baby.

* Best as a gift for birth delivery. *

05

Accessory Case | 05. Nichigetsu / vermilion | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

Nichigetsu (日月 Sun and Moon)

As subjects for the design of NICHIGETSU, the Sun and the Moon are always portrayed in set. The two have long been associated with principles of Yin and Yang: sometimes as representatives for the positive and the negative, other times as metaphors of male and female. Together, they imply the universal harmony.

What is unique about Japanese recognition of the two signs, in comparison to other symbolistic points of view, is that we conceive the Moon to be leading the Sun. Because both are depicted in nearly the same size instead of prioritising as designs these days do, the tint of silver still adds a fresh taste to this classical design.

* Best as a gift for marriage and reconciliation. *

06

Accessory Case | 06. Nichigetsu / black | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

Nichigetsu (日月 Sun and Moon)

As subjects for the design of NICHIGETSU, the Sun and the Moon are always portrayed in set. The two have long been associated with principles of Yin and Yang: sometimes as representatives for the positive and the negative, other times as metaphors of male and female. Together, they imply the universal harmony.

What is unique about Japanese recognition of the two signs, in comparison to other symbolistic points of view, is that we conceive the Moon to be leading the Sun. Because both are depicted in nearly the same size instead of prioritising as designs these days do, the tint of silver still adds a fresh taste to this classical design.

* Best as a gift for marriage and reconciliation. *

07

Accessory Case | 07. Akikusa / vermilion | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

Akikusa (秋草 Autumn Grass)

Depicted are two of the seven grasses of Japanese autumn: bush clovers and eulalia. The selection for those representative plants has been passed down since Yamanoue no Okura, a renowned poet of traditional short poems, chanted in his poem well over 1,300 years ago.

"Aki no no ni / sakitaru hana o / yubi orite
kaki kazoureba / nana kusa no hana.
Hagi ga hana / obana / kuzubana
nadeshiko no hana
ominaeshi / mata fujibakama
asagao no hana."

"Flowers blossoming in autumn fields -
when I count them on my fingers
they then number seven.
The flowers of bush clover, eulalia,
arrowroot, pink patrinia,
also, mistflower and morning faces flower."

(Manyoshu: 8: 1537-8)

Between the end of burning summer and the start of freezing winter, autumn brings with it a sense of faint melancholy. It is the season of nothingness, where memories of excitement are constantly brought back to call nostalgia. Such situation feels quite sentimental, but Yamanoue no Okura, on seeing the seven grasses, discovered that there exists certain beauty. Although the plants are by no means loud, they are beautifully touching - almost holy - in the sense that they reside with your lonesome feelings.

* Best as a gift for farewell. *

08

Accessory Case | 08. Akikusa / black | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

Akikusa (秋草 Autumn Grass)

Depicted are two of the seven grasses of Japanese autumn: bush clovers and eulalia. The selection for those representative plants has been passed down since Yamanoue no Okura, a renowned poet of traditional short poems, chanted in his poem well over 1,300 years ago.

"Aki no no ni / sakitaru hana o / yubi orite
kaki kazoureba / nana kusa no hana.
Hagi ga hana / obana / kuzubana
nadeshiko no hana
ominaeshi / mata fujibakama
asagao no hana."

"Flowers blossoming in autumn fields -
when I count them on my fingers
they then number seven.
The flowers of bush clover, eulalia,
arrowroot, pink patrinia,
also, mistflower and morning faces flower."

(Manyoshu: 8: 1537-8)

Between the end of burning summer and the start of freezing winter, autumn brings with it a sense of faint melancholy. It is the season of nothingness, where memories of excitement are constantly brought back to call nostalgia. Such situation feels quite sentimental, but Yamanoue no Okura, on seeing the seven grasses, discovered that there exists certain beauty. Although the plants are by no means loud, they are beautifully touching - almost holy - in the sense that they reside with your lonesome feelings.

* Best as a gift for farewell. *

09

Accessory Case | 09. Musubi / vermilion | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

Musubi (結び Reef Knot)

Literally meaning "to tie a ribbon," the design of MUSUBI signifies a wish for events to never repeat in the future. The act of tying, in Japanese, is used not only for ribbons but also for a link with others ("en wo musubu," or to form an intimate relationship). Such connotation has familiarised the motif in scenes of celebrating important life events, for instance a wedding. A couple is to experience a wedding only once as long as they stay together and do not break the marital bond.

* Best as a gift for marriage and health recovery. *

10

Accessory Case | 10. Musubi / black | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

Musubi (結び Reef Knot)

Literally meaning "to tie a ribbon," the design of MUSUBI signifies a wish for events to never repeat in the future. The act of tying, in Japanese, is used not only for ribbons but also for a link with others ("en wo musubu," or to form an intimate relationship). Such connotation has familiarised the motif in scenes of celebrating important life events, for instance a wedding. A couple is to experience a wedding only once as long as they stay together and do not break the marital bond.

* Best as a gift for marriage and health recovery. *

11

Accessory Case | 11. Byakudan | YAMADA HEIANDO - Japanese Emperor's choice of lacquerware

Byakudan (白檀 Sandalwood)

Sandalwood, with spicy but gorgeous scent, has evolved worldwide as a fragrant tree for the nobility to relish its aroma. The Japanese has pursued its possibility further to apply it to lacquer coating, overlaying gold and silver leaf to express this unique amber colour.

The technique, however, once comes close to going extinct in the emergence of "maki-e." In order to preserve this tradition of sandalwood coating, YAMADA HEIANDO cast light on its sincere beauty and began our famous "Byakudan" Series (白檀シリーズ the Sandalwood Series). We excelled the original method and invented a better way to stabilize the hue. The amber colour, which used to dapple for difficulty in adjusting the drying process to surrounding conditions, now appears in the perfect unison. It was, and still is, the sandalwood coating technique of our exclusive craftsmen that protected this amber beauty.

* Best as a gift for business. *